Pain from Morton’s Neuroma and Plantar Fasciitis= Good Times!

Colorado Pre-Surgery

Colorado Pre-Surgery. I love my crazy socks. Since it was a slow day I decided to pull up my pants and take a pic.

As you already know, the pain from my nerve damage is back! Because I had a “break” from it, I now realize how horrible it is and that I had become somewhat “accustomed” to it. Not only do I have this excruciating pain in my toes and balls of both feet, but I also have pain in my heels which I am assuming is Plantar Fasciitis (probably from the way I now walk because of the pain and not being able to bear my weight on certain places on my feet). I do not really care what it’s called, it just hurts! Lately I’ve been at a “9” on the pain scale (and I have a high pain tolerance). The reason I won’t give it a “10,” is because I’ve experienced pain on a whole new level numerous times since I’ve had Lupus and just when I think that pain could not be any worse, something else will prove me wrong. To think that pain can be any worse frightens me a lot!

Recap: I first experienced this very intense pain in my left foot somewhere around 2006. I just dealt with it because I had become used to going to different PCPs and Rheumatologists for answers to new symptoms and pain that began to introduce themselves into my life and was usually brushed off. Their answers were usually, “I don’t know,” or “It’s probably just the Lupus.” Really? That’s it? Not only did they not know and go on to the next subject but they wouldn’t even try to offer any allevement. It was a waste of my life and money so I would only go to my doctors for their follow up appointments or if something was exceedingly bad. I figured that there was nothing that could be done. I was referred to a Podiatrist who gave me a few options and not wanting to undergo surgery, I opted for the horrid cortisone shots. Not only was it the most painful shot I’ve ever had in my life but it didn’t work after the first shot! It was a “miracle” shot until a month later when the pain returned. The next two shots didn’t work at all so I just tried to deal with it as the only other option was surgery. Around 2008, I had the same type of pain in my right foot and it was worse than the first Morton’s Neuroma. I dealt with it, gritting my teeth and making tight fists as I dug my fingernails into my hands. I had heard that if another part of your body was in “pain,” then it would take away from other pain one may be feeling. (It didn’t help). I didn’t have to be on my feet to feel the pain, even if I was sitting in a chair, or just laying in bed, the pain was always there. Many nights as I laid in bed, I couldn’t remember how it felt to not have this pain. I wished that I could have just one night without pain and promised myself that I would cherish every second of it. When it became much more than I could bear, I went back to the Podiatrist, finally willing to have surgery on at least the right foot and eventually later I would do the same for the left. The surgical plan was to cut the nerve in my foot which would leave my foot numb. I was exchanging pain for numbness. Not the most favorable plan in my mind but I just wanted it to go away!

I waited until the following year to schedule the surgery due to work. They didn’t have anyone to cover my position while I was gone, so I waited until I just couldn’t stand it anymore and told my manager early in the year (late January) that I needed to schedule this surgery as soon as possible. She told me that she was using her vacation time in March and that I would have to wait until April to schedule it. I was pissed! I could not believe that she would make me wait another three months when she knew I had been dealing with this for so long! In April when it was time for surgery, I was extremely grateful that my mom came to help me for two weeks since I was living alone in Colorado. All of my friends who said they would be there to help didn’t visit or even call to see how I was doing except for one person who brought me flowers after I returned home from outpatient surgery.I really appreciated her thoughtfulness. I lived on the second floor of an apartment complex which made it difficult to go out to buy groceries or go to doctor appointments. I couldn’t drive (something I did not think about until after surgery) so my mom’s willingness to fly out to help meant so much to me. I didn’t even have to ask her, which I wouldn’t have because of the inconvenience and the price of airline tickets.

Chances of the surgery being a success was 90%. Pretty good, right? Well I fell under the other 10%. So not only is my right foot numb and tingly but it still hurts like hell! One morning within the first week after surgery, I woke up in so much pain that I broke down and cried. I have only cried twice from pain in my life (excluding when I was a child. I’m sure I must have cried then) and I was also way beyond frustrated. I couldn’t stand up and was on the ground. I had to use the bathroom but didn’t want to ask for help and refused my mom’s offer as I was determined to do this by myself. It was harder than I thought as I tried to drag my body on the floor towards the bathroom. Then when I got to the toilet, I could not get up. Finally I let my mom help me. I’m very stubborn and proud, I did not want to admit “defeat” or that I required assistance to do something so simple at the age of 35.

I had mentioned the pain in my feet to at least two different PCP’s, two different Rheumatologists, a Podiatrist, and an Orthopedist. Because no other options were mentioned or it took so long for new options to be introduced to me, I came to the conclusion that this was my lot in life. I thought that nothing could be done about it, “it is what it is,” and I would just have to deal with it. Now that the pain has returned after it miraculously disappeared for three months, I realize to live like this is absolutely asinine! Something needs to be done and I’m over it! I mentioned it to my nurse last Friday when she was in my department using our fax machine. She told me to send a message to my doctor. It was good that she was there and told me to email him or I wouldn’t have. She made me feel like this is a legit thing to discuss more in depth with him. She asked if I had heard of Gabapentin. I then remembered that I did. When I was still in Colorado, my PCP finally mentioned it (after years of telling her how bad the pain in my feet was). All she did was refer me to a Podiatrist and then an Orthopedist. When she mentioned Gabapentin, she wanted me to first try two other medications before talking more about it. I was angry that she failed to mention anything (even the other two meds) earlier. I was thinking, “Are you kidding me?” Because apparently there was something out there that could possibly help me and “only now” was she mentioning any of it. I tried the other two medications first like she suggested hoping that it would help but began to experience more pain. I left a message with her receptionist about it and she called me back to say that it was probably one of the new meds and told me which one to stop taking. I continued with the other but stopped that one on my own when it wasn’t working either. Somehow the option of Gabapentin had slipped my mind. It was probably because I was depressed and also stressed out at work and in my home life.

So on Friday I emailed my current PCP and asked him what he thought about Gabapentin. He emailed me back and told me to set up an appointment to see him to discuss the options of either Lyrica or Gabapentin. I tried to research both of them but was overwhelmed with the information, pros and cons, and side effects which I may or may not experience. I figured I would just speak to him as soon as I can get an appointment. I am looking forward to my next visit with him hoping that I can get some relief from at least the nerve pain. I’m also wondering if the pain I sometimes get in my left shoulder that lasts 3-5 days is some kind of nerve pain as well. So far none of my doctors have an answer for that one.

My PCP is leaving our clinic (it’s so convenient to be located on the same floor right next to his) and I really like him. He will still be practicing but will be on the other side of the island. If I was on the mainland, the drive would not be so bad, however on an island with one main road where one accident can majorly impact traffic on the whole island and just the way that traffic flows, it’s not an ideal drive (especially since I do not like to drive). However I am willing to drive to see him because he knows me, my condition(s), listens intently, answers my questions and if he doesn’t know the answer he will either consult other doctors or refer me to a specialist who may be able to help, and I am comfortable to tell him anything. I don’t want to take my chances with another doctor. I told him on our last visit that I wanted to keep him as my doctor if it was okay with him and not to scratch me off his list. He said that was fine, he wasn’t going to drop any patients that still wanted to see him, and that he learned a lot about Lupus from me. I told him he would be a pro soon enough. 🙂

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4 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. lupusreallysucks
    Jun 21, 2014 @ 09:31:04

    I have found pharmacists to more helpful than anyone when it comes to information on specific medications. Surprising but true….doctors are often the least educated about medications. They usually know very little beyond what the drug rep tells them.

    Reply

    • mkingr
      Jun 21, 2014 @ 12:03:02

      I will ask pharmacists more questions then. I remember once a few months ago a Pharmacist told me something that Prednisone does. Unfortunately I no longer remember what he told me but I do remember thinking, “Why didn’t my doctor tell me that?” (I think it was something about the Adrenal Gland). Thanks for the advice. 🙂

      Reply

  2. lupusreallysucks
    Mar 13, 2015 @ 04:41:37

    Did you ever try the Gabapentin? My neuro has prescribe it for me for seizures but I haven’t started taking it. I don’t much like what I read about it. I know I have to take something for the seizures but I don’t want to take anything that is going to end up reducing my quality of life any more than lupus already does.

    Reply

    • mkingr
      Mar 14, 2015 @ 10:25:18

      I tried the Gabapentin for a few months. It did help tremendously with the nerve pain and didn’t seem to affect me negatively. However my med list is long and I want to get off of as many meds as I can. The problem is most of them I cannot stop taking. So I decided to try to stop taking Gabapentin and see if I could just live without it. So far so good. If I ever should need it again I’ll ask my doctor but for now my new Podiatrist wanted me to try the Cortisone shots again hoping this time around it will work for me. I was lucky not to have side effects from the Gabapentin. I would suggest talking to your dr to see if that’s your only (or “best”) option. If it is, try it and if it’s not for you, then you can ween off.

      Reply

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